More People in the US Had COVID-19 than We Knew

There are two separate reports about COVID-19 antibodies present among people who don’t think they’ve been sick. Remarkably, they point to the same percentage of Americans having been infected with the virus.

  • A study of 61,910 persons undergoing medical exams as part of applying for life insurance: 6.6% of blood samples among persons claiming not to ,have had COVID-19 have the antibodies for the coronavirus. That by itself would add millions of infection cases to the US totals.(1)
  • In the first week of March, the American Red Cross reports that 1 in five blood donations from unvaccinated donors contained COVID-19 antibodies.(2)

The insurance study finding by itself is sufficient to double the number of COVID-19 infections in the US.

The finding would “double the number who have been infected with COVID-19 compared to the number of clinically diagnosed cases,” lead author Robert L. Stout, PhD, chief scientific officer at Clinical Reference Laboratory, Inc in Lenexa, Kansas, told Medscape Medical News .

Medscape(1)

The insurance study by itself would raise the estimated number of cases in the US to close to 60 million, or almost 20% of all Americans. That’s consistent with the Red Cross finding that 20% of the unvaccinated have been infected.

We don’t know about the continued presence of the virus in the bodies of symptomless people, or of any latent organ damage that may manifest itself later in life.

We do know that the coming strain of the virus, B117, is much more lethal than what we’ve dealt with to date.

We’re not done with the virus until the virus says so.

And remember, if the US had acted in concert with Australia and New Zealand last year, we wouldn’t have this mess. The US didn’t, and we’re paying a huge price for GOP stupidity.

Sources:

  1. https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/947580?src=mkm_covid_update_210316_MSCPEDIT&uac=153634BV&impID=3252915&faf=1
  2. https://www.cnn.com/2021/03/15/health/red-cross-blood-donations-covid-antibodies/index.html
  3. https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/

7 comments

  1. Back in January of 2020 I came down with a cold. I was coughing a bit, but I’ve never smoked and have no respiratory problems so I shook that part pretty fast. The problem was, I had no energy, I was always tired. I couldn’t concentrate and sometimes when I was talking the air would just be gone from my lungs. It was March before I felt better and by then we knew Covid was a HUGE problem and my state went into lock down. I wish I had known more back in January, but would it have mattered? Probably not. You could only get tested if you were admitted into the hospital, nobody knew what to do. Now we have the vaccine roll out and guess what I’m not eligible at this time.

    Liked by 1 person

    • My wife and I both caught the virus by attending a funeral right after Christmas for a friend’s father. January was miserable. Periodically, the symptoms recur, although I took the first dose of the Moderna vaccine yesterday, and my wife got the shot today. The goal is to have enough vaccine for all adults by May 1. You don’t say in which state you live. We’re in NJ and got the appointment through a statewide scheduling website. Some people we know got the shot earlier by talking to local pharmacists and getting put on a standby list. Pharmacists don’t want to throw away a shot when there’s a no show, and once a vial is opened it has to be used or tossed.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I live in Washington state. The group I’m in will be the last group to be eligible, from what I can see.We have the website to as well as an email system to get updates in case that changes, I don’t think it will

        Liked by 1 person

  2. From the get-go, the US did not do comprehensive testing and randomized community studies to assess prevalence. The hope remains that those who were infected will maintain a long-lasting immunity. Currently CDC recommends that covid survivors get immunized too.

    Liked by 2 people

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.