Continuing Education for Doctors: What Your State Requires

Standard

Medicine is highly dynamic. By one report, there are 4,500 pages of new findings produced every day — that’s a huge amount of material. A conscientious practitioner is going to spend hours each day on homework. Some doctors do, some don’t.

What do states require? There are requirements for continuing education in most (but not all) states in the US. That’s simple recognition of the fact that what one learns in medical school will become obsolete over time.

The states vary from no requirement for continuing education to a requirement of an average of 50 hours per year.  Here are the tiers. (1)

  • No requirement:
    • Colorado
    • Indiana
    • Montana
    • New York
    • South Dakota
  • 15 hours per year (average):
    • Vermont
    • Wisconsin
  • 20 hours per year (average):
    • Arizona
    • Arkansas
    • Delaware
    • Florida
    • Georgia
    • Idaho
    • Iowa
    • Kentucky
    • Louisiana
    • Mississippi
    • Nevada
    • North Carolina
    • North Dakota
    • Oklahoma
    • Oregon
    • Rhode Island
    • South Carolina
    • Tennessee
    • Utah
    • Wyoming
  • 24 hours per year (average):
    • Texas
  • 25 hours per year (average):
    • Alabama
    • Alaska
    • California
    • Connecticut
    • District of Columbia
    • Maryland
    • Minnesota
    • Missouri
    • Nebraska
    • New Mexico
    • West Virginia
  • 30 hours per year (average):
    • Virginia
  • 33 hours per year (average):
    • Kansas
  • 50 hours per year (average):
    • Hawaii
    • Illinois
    • Maine
    • Massachusetts
    • Michigan
    • New Hampshire
    • New Jersey
    • Ohio
    • Pennsylvania
    • Washington

How much is enough? None is probably not good. Even 3 days per year seems light.

The problem is that doctors can’t be counted upon to sign up for training when it isn’t required. In one example, in 2015, to counter the current epidemic of painkiller abuse, the FDA required drug makers to offer opioid training classes for physicians. Unfortunately, only 38,000 of the roughly 320,000 physicians who prescribe these drugs signed up for the classes. (2)

What training has your doctor taken recently?


Sources:

  1. Medscape, “State CME Requirements,” last updated April 2016. http://www.medscape.org/public/staterequirements
  2. Bloomberg, “Undertrained Doctors, Overprescribed Drugs,” 4 May 2016. https://www.bloomberg.com/view/articles/2016-05-04/undertrained-doctors-overprescribed-drugs
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s